Latin American Women’s Aid’s Statement On Our Participation in the Women’s March on London

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By Jael Garcia and Rosa Heimer 

On the past 21st of January, the Latin American Women’s Aid, together with other Latin American women, marched on the Women’s March on London. We decided to join the Women’s March on London because we Latin American women and other Black and Minority ethnic women and migrant women have been for long but are now more than ever being particularly threatened and targeted by racism, xenophobia and sexism both in the US but also in the UK. Trump embodies these hate discourses, policies and practices as much as Theresa May or Nigal Farage in the UK austerity scenario and post-Brexit vote scenario in which cuts to Domestic Violence services, racism and anti-migrant practices have been legitimised and widespread. The attack to our rights and the rise of hate is a cross border reality and we, women of colour and migrant women are the hardest hit. That said, we felt interpolated to join an International movement of women in one of many Sisters Women’s March happening in the world.
As a Latin American BME organisation, as black feminists committed to intersectional feminism, we understood the Women’s March on London as an opportunity to take the streets, raise our voices and self-represent our struggles. Our journey of taking action is not limited to this march, we have been for decades resisting and collectively building spaces to transform the oppressive structures of power, nurturing the collective empowerment of migrant women of colour and the self-determination of our communities. However, although the Women’s March on London at first seemed to call for a collective action in favour of the rights of women, in fact, it did not properly allow for all voices of women to be represented. We regret that the prevailed discourse has been a white feminism one that reinforces privilege, reproduces power imbalances, and silences the voices of other women.
One of our lessons learnt at the Women’s March on London is the urgency to bring to the forefront of the debate an analysis of race, class, borders, disability, power, privilege and other oppressions that we, women of colour, experience in opposition to a white washed feminism that prevailed in this march. As a BME feminist organisation we believe that feminism has to be intersectional. We believe in a feminist movement that deeply acknowledges intersectional forms of oppression and brings the voices and concerns of migrants, black women and women of colour; working class women; disabled women; LBTQ women and non-binary people to the heart of this movement by allowing space for self-representation.
We regret that the Women’s March did not fully reflect such principles. We stand in solidarity with other women of colour who have raised very important critiques to the organisers of the Women’s March London, raising its lack of intersectionality and inclusivity and eventually deciding not to attend to the march. We recognise their decision not to attend the march as a political act of resistance. We stand in solidarity with all women who felt unrepresented and excluded from the organizational process, and despite this, challenged the organizers of the Women’s March on London writing powerful statements denouncing the vices and practices that permeate feminist spaces, which are based on privilege. We hope that in the future, together we can build more inclusive and intersectional feminist spaces and movements truly based on sisterhood and solidarity. Our protest and resistance did not start and does not end with the Women’s March.